Tenfoot Footbridge

TENFOOT FOOTBRIDGE

Site of the Tenfoot Weir

"Ten foot" was probably the width removed from the flash weir to allow vessels through. However Fred Thacker suggested a different explanation -

At about twenty miles from Oxford stands [Ten Footbridge], whose name Ten used to puzzle me. It is certainly more than ten feet both in height and width, so I imagined that "Ten" must be a proper name and not a numeral. Later I found it called "Thames" Footbridge; of which "Ten" is evidently a corruption.; and this seems to satisfy me.

1791:  Jessop “the 10 feet weir”
1869: Order for the removal of the weir.  The weir was removed and the bridge built.  A right of way had become established over the old weir and therefore a footbridge became necessary.

1885: The Royal River -

One's attention cannot fail to be arrested by the high, skeleton-like, weather-worn bridge called Tenfoot Weir. This is another site of a weir long fallen into disuse. The wooden bridge consists of a central arch, or compartment, of staging set twenty feet high, with steep flights of steps on either side, the central division marking the outline of the old weir. A thatched cottage and thickly clustering willows in the bend which is here formed by the course of the river present an extremely picturesque variety to the monotonous character of the [mile above here].

1897: Tenfoot Bridge, James Dredge -

Tenfoot Bridge, James Dredge, 1897
Tenfoot Bridge, James Dredge, 1897
© Oxfordshire County Council Photographic Archive; D230440a

1999:–

Tenfoot Bridge
Tenfoot Bridge.

2005: Ten foot Bridge, Doug Myers -

Tenfoot Bridge, Doug Myers © 2005
Tenfoot Bridge, Doug Myers © 2005 (7am!)

I think this is an aerial view from Tenfoot Bridge towards Tadpole Bridge -

Aerial View near Tenfoot Bridge
From Tenfoot Bridge looking towards Tadpole Bridge?

Site of Thames Weir

Site of weir half way between Tenfoot Bridge and Site of Tadpole Weir.
1821:  In a very bad state.