ABINGDON LOCK

This weather forecast is generated by the Met Office Weather Widget

How is flow estimated?

EA ABINGDON Downstream graph -
EA ABINGDON Upstream graph -


from Environment Agency Guide 2012-2013

Lock on RIGHT bank, length: 120', width: 18'9"
Abingdon Weir for canoists. See also.

1316:  Complaint against John de Salter, Abbot of Abingdon – for so heightening his weir that both banks above were often flooded.
His successor was drowned - see Abingdon Bridge.
1649:  Abingdon Weir (the word “Lock” is used) built by Sir George Stonehouse and Richard Adams, see photo of 1910.
1790:  First Pound Lock built

1805: Abingdon Lock by William Turner of Oxford [not JMW Turner] –
[ I thought at first it might just be Nuneham Lock (I don’t know if it was a pound lock or not) – but compare the heights of the church steeple in this and the 2002 photo – this is Abingdon Lock.]

Abingdon from the Thames Navigation, William Turner of Oxford, 1805
Abingdon from the Thames Navigation, William Turner of Oxford, 1805.

1805: And then Byrne published this black and white print -

Abingdon from the Thames Navigation, Byrne, 1805
Abingdon from the Thames Navigation, Byrne, 1805.

Who copied whom?
Abingdon Lock, Henry Taunt -

Abingdon Lock, Henry Taunt, 1885
Abingdon Lock, Henry Taunt, 1885
© Oxfordshire County Council Photographic Archive; HT3199

1890: Abingdon, the Lock from downstream, Francis Frith -

1890: Abingdon, the Lock from downstream, Francis Frith
1890: Abingdon, the Lock from downstream, Francis Frith

1905:  Lock rebuilt
 

1910:  Fred Thacker –

When I was through the lock in 1910 Mr. Drew the lockkeeper called my attention to a stone built into the left wall of the midmost of the three weirs -

This locke was bvilded by
Sr George Stonehouse and
Richard Adams Ann. 1649

Abingdon Lock stone, photo by lock keeper Mr Drew, 1910
Abingdon Lock stone, photo by lock keeper Mr Drew, 1910.

2002: -

Abingdon Lock, 2002
Abingdon Lock, 2002

Swift Ditch

The Swift Ditch is now a weir stream leaving on the RIGHT bank above the lock. It was at one time the main stream.
955-963: Ethelwolde made the cut which is now the main navigation (according to Leland 1535)
1060:  Oxford Petition to make the new stream the main navigation.
1535:  Leland –

The chefe stream of Isis ran afore betwixt Andersey Isle and Culneham, even where now the south End is of Culneham.
Ethelwolde, Abbate of Abbingdon, and after Bishop of Winchestre, yn King Edgares days - caused - a Gut to cum out of Isis by force to serve and purge thofficis of thabbay.

[ Which being translated means that the beautiful course of the Thames at Abingdon, and that lovely bridge, were all accidentally created because a medieval Abbot wanted a flushing lavatory! The monks would then have used this new stream to transport goods to and from the abbey. ]

1577:  William Harrison,  Description of England -

No part [of the Thames] at the first came so neere the towne as it doth now, till a branch thereof was led thither from the maine streame, thorough the industrie of the monks.

1624:  Swift Ditch reopened as main navigation
1790:  Main Navigation restored to the Abingdon Stream.