CAVERSHAM LOCK


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How is flow estimated?

EA CAVERSHAM Downstream graph -
EA CAVERSHAM Upstream graph -


from Environment Agency Guide 2012-2013

Left bank, tel: 0118 957 5764, length: 131'4", width: 17'11"
871: The life of King Alfred -

In the year of our Lord's incarnation 871, which was the twenty- third of King Alfred's life, the pagan army, of hateful memory, left the East-Angles, and entering the kingdom of the West-Saxons, came to the royal city, called Reading, situated on the south bank of the Thames, in the district called Berkshire; and there, on the third day after their arrival, their earls, with great part of the army, scoured the country for plunder, while the others made a rampart between the rivers Thames and Kennet on the right side of the same royal city.
They were encountered by Ethelwulf, earl of Berkshire, with his men, at a place called Englefield; both sides fought bravely, and made long resistance. At length one of the pagan earls was slain, and the greater part of the army destroyed; upon which the rest saved themselves by flight, and the Christians gained the victory.

1493:  The Old Lock, the mills and mill barge, the ferry and its boat, all granted to Notley Abbey
1593:  Bishop mentions the flash lock and weir
1778:  A pound lock was built
1813:  The first steam boat seen at Reading.
1871: The Corporation of Reading obtained leave to build a swingbridge across the cut, just above the lock.  It was not built.
1875:  Lock rebuilt
1878:  Breakwater below lock built.

1881: George Leslie, "Our River" -

Just beyond Caversham Lock there is a walled-in bathing-place for the town of Reading.  The river is decidedly ugly here, and does not recover itself until after Caversham Bridge is past. There are one or two little eyots and backwaters on the right just beyond the lock, where white water-lilies grow when allowed to do so by the townspeople.  Reading folks do not seem much addicted to aquatics, and the boats let out for hire here are just the sort to suit what Mr. Calderon used to call “drowning parties”.

1890:  Caversham Lock, Henry Taunt -

Caversham Lock, Henry Taunt, 1890
Caversham Lock, Henry Taunt, 1890
© Oxfordshire County Council Photographic Archive; HT6417

1890:  Above Caversham Lock, Francis Frith -

1890:  Above Caversham Lock, Francis Frith
1890:  Above Caversham Lock, Francis Frith

1890:  Caversham Weir, Francis Frith -

1890:  Caversham Weir, Francis Frith
1890:  Caversham Weir, Francis Frith

1890: Below Caversham Lock, Francis Frith -

1890: Below Caversham Lock, Francis Frith
1890: Below Caversham Lock, Francis Frith

1890: The Clappers Footbridge, below Caversham Lock by W F Austin -

The Clappers, W F Austin, 1890
The Clappers, W F Austin, 1890

1924:  From above Caversham Lock Cut, Francis Frith -

1924:  Below Caversham Bridge, Francis Frith
1924:  Above Caversham Lock Cut, Francis Frith

1931:  Lock keepers house rebuilt

1999:-

Caversham Lock, 1999
Caversham Lock, 1999