Bourne End Railway Bridge

Bourne End Railway Bridge

1857: Built in Timber by T H Bartram, Brunel's assistant and successor.
1869: Known as "Marlow Railway Bridge"

Fred Thacker –

It must have been a terror to navigation.  There was much complaint of its dangerous state;  barges frequently collided with it and were sued by the railway company for damage.

1880: First Bourne End Railway Bridge, Henry Taunt -

First Bourne End Railway Bridge, Henry Taunt, 1880
First Bourne End Railway Bridge, Henry Taunt, 1880
© Oxfordshire County Council Photographic Archive; HT2819

The Jolly Young Watermaids, anon, Punch, [sounds like Ashby-Sterry] -

And have you not read of eight jolly young watermaids,
Lately at Cookham accustomed to ply
And feather their oars with a deal of dexterity,
Pleasing the critical masculine eye?
They swing so truly and pull so steadily,
Multitudes flock to the river-side readily:-
It’s not the eighth wonder that all the world’'s there,
But this watermaid eight, ne’'er in want of a stare.
 
What sights of white costumes! What ties and what hatbands,
‘Leander Cerise’! We don't wish to offend,
But are these first thoughts with the dashing young women
Who don’'t dash too much in a spurt off Bourne End?
Mere nonsense, of course! There’'s no ‘giggling and leering’ –
Complete ruination to rowing and steering; -
‘"All eyes in the boat’"" is their coach’s' first care,
And ‘a spin of twelve miles’ is as naught to the fair.

Ladies Eight at Bourne End Railway Bridge
Ladies Eight at the first Bourne End Railway Bridge.

1895:  A new steel bridge, designed by J C Inglis.
1897: Second Bourne End Railway Bridge, James Dredge -

Second Bourne End Railway Bridge, James Dredge, 1897
Second Bourne End Railway Bridge, James Dredge, 1897
© Oxfordshire County Council Photographic Archive; D230177a

In dredging near this bridge a dug-out flat-bottomed boat of oak, probably of the Bronze Age, was found and given to the late Frank Buckland for his collection at South Kensington Museum.
1994/5:  a footpath was attached to the upstream side of the bridge to form part of the Thames Path and to replace the Spade Oak Ferry.

Bourne End Railway Bridge 1999
Bourne End Railway Bridge in 1999

Bourne End Railway Bridge, Doug Myers © 2005
Bourne End Railway Bridge, Doug Myers © 2005